harechanart:


Colored Sketch Commission | Eric Andersen for eletunamage

My stream for tonight is over (my back is not happy today), but here’s one of the sketches I worked on during it. I’ll be streaming again next week - most likely on Friday, Feb 21st.

harechanart:

Colored Sketch Commission | Eric Andersen for eletunamage

My stream for tonight is over (my back is not happy today), but here’s one of the sketches I worked on during it. I’ll be streaming again next week - most likely on Friday, Feb 21st.

(Reblogged from harechanart)

Laura wanted to help at the table since she couldn’t get into the Con Mood so I drew this for her as a thanks.

Louis and Lestat have always been two of my favorite literary vampires.

The aforementioned post-apocalyptic pony Copic commission - Blackjack from Fallout: Equestria, with and without a background since I couldn’t decide which I liked.

I just inked a post-apocalyptic pony for a commission.  I’m not sure what to think about this turn of events.  I suppose it’s interesting.

Wow. Glad I’m not a Professional Artist.

erulisse2:

harecommissions:

milkcannonsclaycafe:

Wow. Glad I’m not a Professional Artist.

deserteddreams:

harecommissions:

Because apparently being a PROFESSIONAL ARTIST means being an asshole. I don’t get the mentality that being “professional” means that you should be rude to other artists and be solely focused on making money.

See, I don’t get this whole ‘being a complete and total ass to other artists is just the professional thing to do’ mentality. It makes no sense. I would really much rather have fun and be friends and make the whole freaking working experience more fun.

Can you be nice to other artists and still have a functional art career? Yes you can.

Being ‘professional’ (especially when you ARE NOT) does not excuse being a raging asshole to all the other artists around you.

This brings up a very interesting question. Should “customers” care about the personal lives of artists? When looking to art history, it’s filled with artists with less then stellar personalities, but they always cared about art first and foremost. Not about money, but about their craft. Of course, then we get into the question of what is considered “art” or not. Is a professional fan artist an artist?

Personally, I don’t like the idea of living life by being rude to others. Conventions are a lot of fun, and I enjoy selling and meeting new people there. I don’t feel like my fan art is fine art, and I’m not foolish enough to believe that I’m a professional. Maybe once I start selling more original work will I feel like I have that right :)

For me it isn’t even about conventions or fanart/original art.  It’s about being a decent person.

There just seems to be general belief that if you’re “professional” or a popular artist you have to be a jerk?  It just… does not compute for me.  I’ve worked customer service plenty and I know there are ways to be a complete bitch to a person and have them be happy about what you’re doing for them.  I’ve seen drama stirred up by popular artists on devART and no one calls them on it because, “OMG. They’re such a better artist than ANYONE.” and of course their little whiteknighters ready to defend at the drop of a hat.

I just.  I can’t wrap my head around this mentality.  Someone that you snub, that you insult, that you’re rude to - be they a client, customer, employer, or peer - could be someone that can get you an opening into another door, a new con, a better supplier, a bigger clientele, whatever.  And it doesn’t just apply to the art world. 

I studied physics for four years and as part of my program I had a summer internship at a national lab.  Because I did a good job and I was NICE to my coworkers, I was encouraged to apply for a second internship (which… doesn’t happen often).  I got my job at the environmental lab on campus for the same reason.  I was nice to my peers and worked hard.  My sister was hired over an equally qualified applicant because of the same reason.

Being professional does not equal being a jerk.  And really, nice guys don’t finish last - they’re usually the ones that have the higher pay grade.

actually, if you think about it….

a lot of classical art is “fan art” of the gods and so forth, if you think of fanart as a homage or a tribute or even an offering to a character/idea.

Huh.  Never looked at it that way.  What an interesting way to do so, though.

(Reblogged from shadowaeledfyr)

Wow. Glad I’m not a Professional Artist.

milkcannonsclaycafe:

Wow. Glad I’m not a Professional Artist.

deserteddreams:

harecommissions:

Because apparently being a PROFESSIONAL ARTIST means being an asshole. I don’t get the mentality that being “professional” means that you should be rude to other artists and be solely focused on making money.

See, I don’t get this whole ‘being a complete and total ass to other artists is just the professional thing to do’ mentality. It makes no sense. I would really much rather have fun and be friends and make the whole freaking working experience more fun.

Can you be nice to other artists and still have a functional art career? Yes you can.

Being ‘professional’ (especially when you ARE NOT) does not excuse being a raging asshole to all the other artists around you.

This brings up a very interesting question. Should “customers” care about the personal lives of artists? When looking to art history, it’s filled with artists with less then stellar personalities, but they always cared about art first and foremost. Not about money, but about their craft. Of course, then we get into the question of what is considered “art” or not. Is a professional fan artist an artist?

Personally, I don’t like the idea of living life by being rude to others. Conventions are a lot of fun, and I enjoy selling and meeting new people there. I don’t feel like my fan art is fine art, and I’m not foolish enough to believe that I’m a professional. Maybe once I start selling more original work will I feel like I have that right :)

For me it isn’t even about conventions or fanart/original art.  It’s about being a decent person.

There just seems to be general belief that if you’re “professional” or a popular artist you have to be a jerk?  It just… does not compute for me.  I’ve worked customer service plenty and I know there are ways to be a complete bitch to a person and have them be happy about what you’re doing for them.  I’ve seen drama stirred up by popular artists on devART and no one calls them on it because, “OMG. They’re such a better artist than ANYONE.” and of course their little whiteknighters ready to defend at the drop of a hat.

I just.  I can’t wrap my head around this mentality.  Someone that you snub, that you insult, that you’re rude to - be they a client, customer, employer, or peer - could be someone that can get you an opening into another door, a new con, a better supplier, a bigger clientele, whatever.  And it doesn’t just apply to the art world. 

I studied physics for four years and as part of my program I had a summer internship at a national lab.  Because I did a good job and I was NICE to my coworkers, I was encouraged to apply for a second internship (which… doesn’t happen often).  I got my job at the environmental lab on campus for the same reason.  I was nice to my peers and worked hard.  My sister was hired over an equally qualified applicant because of the same reason.

Being professional does not equal being a jerk.  And really, nice guys don’t finish last - they’re usually the ones that have the higher pay grade.

(Reblogged from milkcannoncharms)

Wow. Glad I’m not a Professional Artist.

Because apparently being a PROFESSIONAL ARTIST means being an asshole.  I don’t get the mentality that being “professional” means that you should be rude to other artists and be solely focused on making money.

The Riddler for Laura, who was very patient with me and then got a traditional commission because I am le suck and forget things.  Playing with Copics was really fun though!

Riku and Namine from Kingdom Hearts

We actually printed off commission pricing sheets for this con.  Listing “intricate weapons” as an extra cost was the best idea ever (along with wings and extra characters).

Third:  Ichigo from Bleach